Watching an NFL game with Social Media

Have you ever watched an NFL game while following Twitter, FB and/or IG? Would you follow Social Media while your favorite team is playing? Should you only watch the game on the TV? Or would you use Social Media if you couldn’t watch the game? Where would you follow play-by-play or what is happening every second of the game?
I love Football. I love following NFL “experts” while I am watching the Dolphins. Why “experts” because sometimes they are haters, trolls, they don’t think like me, they don’t know football or are only “ball watchers.” By ball watchers I mean, people who watch a sport but don’t know what is going on all around. Line Backers, Offensive Line, Defensive Line, Corner backs, etc. Fans that not only blame the QB for an interception or incomplete pass, but also blame the coach or the wind, or the grass or the sun… when it wasn’t the QBs fault.
https://twitter.com/i/web/status/902493071803379712 or https://twitter.com/OmarKelly/status/922453301915942912
I do consider myself I knowledgeable football fan. While I am watching the Dolphins, I follow several Sun Sentinel, and Miami Herald writers @adamHbeasley, NFL writers, ESPN @JamesWalkerNFL and Official Miami Dolphins beat writers @Omarkelly

Each writer and follower is different in their way of tweeting the news, tweeting the play-by-play, being sarcastic or realistic. Some over-optimistic, but what I don’t like are those who just troll other writers or just straight pessimistic. While I am watching the game, it’s difficult to see who is on the field and who made the play. Sometimes you need to watch games in bars, where volume is not on. I really do suggest that you research who are the beat writers, and local newspapers writers that are matched with your favorite team and give them a follow.

Everyone has heard of Fantasy Football. Probably the majority have a fantasy football team. If you don’t, this won’t be helpful. If you do, these are some examples I follow to have all news in a timely matter, a.k.a. Twitter:

@Rapsheet – Ian Rapaport (he has all the news no matter which team you root for) – Not only active/inactive players but also injuries before games start. This is useful because if you are not sure, this is official information (he did get it wrong only once) of teams who announce inactive players or declare players as out. Before 1 pm, everyone knows you need to have your Team ready. Another must follow @Michael_Fabiano. He not only gives you news on the go (Yes, in Twitter) but also during all week. He even replies tweets of random fans asking questions.
All those stats do mean something. Sometimes I don’t believe in stats because they rate players performance based on tackles or snap counts. But I do like this account @PFF_Miami and @PFF (Pro Football Focus). This is a stat company backed by Cris Collinsworth who I also follow @CollinsworthPFF.
Finally, on Fantasy, I need to look for info regarding one player. So just search “Devante Parker,” and voila… Inactive, by @AdamSchefter

PArker inactive

Postgame I follow only one account, there is way too much content if I want to watch everything. More times than not, it repeats. That is why I chose the beat writer @OmarKelly. He is the most realistic writer and professional who writes about the team. My post social media review is to check out plays, what went good or wrong, some interviews of players, coaches and first thought about the game.
The day after the game there is a column by Andy Cohen @ACohenFins. He has covered the Dolphins since 1980, he writes for the miamidolphins.com website and app. Also, I like following a couple in my twitter feed to learn about injuries during the game and what is happening the next couple of days.

As everyone knows, #’s let you filter all tweets that contain that #. So #Dolphins obviously is useful, unless there is a great day at sea and people tweet about real Dolphins…

Instagram is just to see the best photos of the day any given sunday…
Finally, some memes and fun GIFs always come on handy. I am not a big fan, but in a day that your team loses, they could turn out funny. Normally, these are retweeted by people I follow: https://twitter.com/TheFBLife/status/922230278784933888.

Hopefully, there is a Miami Dolphin fan out there…

10 comments

  1. briandentonbc · ·

    I do the same thing for my favorite team, the Green Bay Packers, as well as follow many of the same accounts for my fantasy football teams. One important thing to note, in regards to digital business, is that what is happening in the NFL has such a presence on social media, that it is impossible to not watch the game live (aka you can’t record it and watch it later). This is important because it means sports are one of the last true cable events that need to be watched live, and therefore forces us to sit through the commercials. Almost all other programs, we can record and watch them later (and fast-forward through commercials) or wait for them to appear on Netflix. The immediate nature of the NFL and other sports, due to their social media presence, makes them a huge market for advertisers

    1. Completely agree! NFL and sports is the “last” true cable program. I am not a cord cutter because of NFL. Go Pack Go

    2. Hilary_Gould · ·

      I definitely agree with this Brian! On Sunday my dad’s flight got delayed so he was going to miss part of the Patriots game– he made my mom record it, but made a point to tell our whole family not to text him about it. He also said he wouldn’t be checking his email until he caught up to live… it ruins the fun of watching a game when you already know the results. Although he doesn’t have any social media, he didn’t want the risk of a friend or family member spoiling the game! Sports truly do have to be watched live! I know the question comes up a lot around the Olympics so it’ll be interesting to see it revisited this year when they are in South Korea with such a big time change.

  2. juliabrodigan · ·

    Awesome post! I am a big Red Sox fan. I do not usually watch the games. Instead, I look on Twitter and Instagram for live updates. I personally like looking at Twitter the best because you can keep up with whats going on in the game while seeing other people’s reactions and predictions. Frankly, it is entertaining. Also, I am not well educated on sports so it allows me to gain a better understanding of what is going on and whether or not that is good. Sometimes before big games I go to social media to see people’s thoughts on the game/line-up.

  3. It’s crazy how social media has added an entirely new dimension to watching sports, specifically the NFL. Fantasy football also adds to the NFL experience as it consumes users and makes them a part of the team. It forces viewers to be actively alert and up to date on injuries, inactive players, active players, trades, etc. With doing this, it increases the adrenaline and competition that viewers already have watching their home team. I don’t have any research to support this theory, but it would be interesting to understand why/if the NFL is the most successful at reaching an audience and integrating them into their game.

  4. paulandresonbc · ·

    Totally agree with this – as a diehard Patriots fan myself, I couldn’t imagine containing my love for the game to just the TV. Football has become such an immersive sport and lifestyle now with the amount of social media coverage and insight surrounding it. Kudos to the NFL and select writers/analysts for making the game so widespread and commonplace. Best of luck to your Fins this year – way to make the AFC East exciting for the first time in a while!

  5. mattwardbc · ·

    I really love how I am able to get insights into schemes and plays while the game is going on and immediately after get up to the moment recaps and fast reactions. I really like Jerry Thornton when it comes to Pats coverage because he always tweets out his article about the game only a couple hours after the game has concluded. If you have a fantasy team, I think twitter is vital as up to the moment injury reports are so important on who to start and who to sit, not only one your own team but on your opponents and your players opponents.

  6. There are also the downside to social media and NFL. Oftentimes I will DVR the game (mainly to skip the commercials). If I accidentally check Twitter during that time, then I have ruined the game for myself on more than one occasion.

    1. rjacques62 · ·

      I had a similar problem with fantasy football. I would be listening to the Jets game through the ESPN app which has a minute or two delay on it. Inevitably, I would check my fantasy app to see how my team was doing and I would end up seeing a significant play through fantasy before I heard it through the radio.

    2. Totally Agree, when i do that or pause it for a second I have to be very patient not to open Twitter or view my cell, I have notifications of favorite teams in NFL app

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